How Social Media Is Changing the Face Of CRM https://goo.gl/oduuxp

You have probably heard the term CRM a lot. Wondering what does it mean? Simply put, CRM stands for Customer Relationship Management which is a system for managing relationships with your customers.

You should be asking yourself now but how does CRM work?

Here is your answer; a CRM system uses all the data that comes from sales, customer, service, marketing, and social media monitoring and translates these data into actionable business information that helps your business manage the customer relationships and interactions that drive success. Imagine having a 360-degree view of your customer right in front of you, wouldn’t that be amazing?

CRM Is Evolving To SCRM

As we live now in a digital world where people spend enormous amount of their time on social media platforms, businesses are moving from traditional CRM to social CRM because this is where their customers live now.

“Social CRM simply adds a social dimension to the way you think about customers and your relationship with them.”

Now take a look at this infographic to see how social media is transforming CRM:

 

Learn from The Best: Amazon Is Doing It the Right Way

Many brands came to the conclusion that it is not about the company, neither the product or the service offered. It is and it will always be about the customer. Hence, being customer-centric or customer-focused is the best strategy. Amazon took that concept even further and invented a new term: “Customer-Obsessed”.

In his words Jeff Bezos explains:

“There are many ways to center a business. You can be competitor focused, you can be product focused, you can be technology focused, you can be business model focused, and there are more. But in my view, obsessive customer focus is by far the most protective of Day 1 vitality. Why? There are many advantages to a customer-centric approach, but here’s the big one: customers are always beautifully, wonderfully dissatisfied, even when they report being happy and business is great. Even when they don’t yet know it, customers want something better, and your desire to delight customers will drive you to invention on their behalf. No customer ever asked Amazon to create the Prime membership program, but it sure turns out they wanted it, and I could give you many such examples. Staying in Day 1 requires you to experiment patiently, accept failures, plant seeds, protect saplings, and double down when you see customer delight. A customer-obsessed culture best creates the conditions where all of that can happen.”

But how would SCRM fit in that customer-obsession culture? In today’s world, everything on social media is highly visible and publicly accessible and for that Jeff Bezos highlights the importance of the social aspect of CRM in few words:

“It used to be that if you made a customer happy, they would tell five friends. Now, with the megaphone of the internet, whether online customer reviews or social media, they can tell 5,000 friends.”

SCRM could help your brand in great ways:

For instance, it could help address and Manage complaints. This is a two-steps process

  • Respond to the public post; it’s not about that single customer, other people would be angry if they see that you ignore your customers. This would make a bad impression and hurt your brand image.
  • Take the conversation private; best way to solve the issue with your customer via direct messages.

Back to Amazon, you should know that Amazon doesn’t just focus on addressing customer complaints. It goes the extra mile to convert critics into fans; commenting directly on the negative review itself, encouraging the unsatisfied customer to leave his or her phone number or email address, so that they can make things right again.

In conclusion, you should know one thing; make one customer happy and watch how his/her entire social media network will know about it. On the other hand, make one customer angry and face the wrath of the internet.

10 figures you have to know about Social Media in 2018

These figures will give you an overview of the use of social media in the world in 2018, and can give you insights about which platform to use for your campaigns!

We gathered the data thanks to the We Are Social global digital report 2018.

1)Among 7,5 billion inhabitants in the world, 3,81 billion people use the internet (51%), and 3,0 billion are using social media (40% of the global population)

 For the first time, more than one out of two people have access to the internet. The number of people on social media is growing, and 9 people out of ten use their phone to go on social media.

2)Facebook has 2 billion users – it is the most used social media platform

Here is the complete top 10:

  1. Facebook: 2 billion active users per month
  2. YouTube: 1,5 billion
  3. Instagram: 800 million
  4. Qzone: 638 million
  5. Twitter: 330 million
  6. Sina Weibo: 313 million
  7. Baidu Tieba : 300 million
  8. Pinterest: 200 million
  9. Snapchat: 178 million (per day)
  10. LinkedIn: 115 million

Maybe you are wondering where Qzone, Baidu Tieba or Sina Weibo come from… They are all from China! Qzone is a social networking website, Baidu Tieba is the largest Chinese communication platform, and Sina Weibo is a microblogging website

3)However, the number of Facebook users between 13 and 17 years old decreased by 6 million this year.

 

4)The engagement rate on Facebook is higher for Facebook page video posts

5)Instagram has the best growth: +36% (compared to only 3% for Twitter)

 6)Instagram users are younger than Twitter users.

Instagram users are mostly between 18 and 34 years old, whereas Twitter users are mostly between 35 and 49 years old.

 

7)Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp are the most used messenger app with both 1,3 billion users worldwide in 2018

 

Here is the complete top 5:

  1. Facebook Messenger: 1,3 billion
  2. WhatsApp: 1,3 billion
  3. WeChat: 938 million
  4. QQ: 861 million (Chinese instant messaging platform)
  5. Skype*: 300 million 

8)Every minute, 7 million pictures or videos are sent through Snapchat.

Do you want more? Every minute…

  • 216 million pictures liked on Facebook
  • 2,4 million pictures liked on Instagram
  • 350 000 tweets on Twitter
  • 400 hours of videos downloaded on YouTube
  • 3,5 million texts in the US

 9)1 billion hours of video are watched every day and users spend more than 1 hour per day on YouTube

10)A daily active user opens Snapchat 25 times a day and sends 20 snaps. He spends 30 minutes on the app per day.

 

GIFs and Memes: The New Art of Marketing https://goo.gl/27jXcP

  I say “Internet”, what is the first thing that comes into your mind? A kid eating tide pods? An incredibly long article explaining why Mark Zuckerberg is a robot? Internet is nothing and everything at the same time, intrinsically it is a place where trends and topics are as short-lived as the career of Sean Kingston. Yet, there are two things that defy the course of time: GIFs and Memes.

First, what are those?

Long story short, a Meme is an image, a GIF is a short video; both have humorous purposes and have a tremendous capacity to go viral.

 

The kingdom of Memes and GIFs are social networks, especially Facebook where being “tagged” on a Meme or a GIF is a daily burden. Marketers are not fools and quickly they started riding the gravy train. As I said, GIFs and Memes can spread easily as social networks’ structure is based on them. No one wants to read a long post like this or see a two-minutes-long ad, people do not have time for it as they checked their social networks during class or at work when the teacher/boss are not looking.

This “culture of brevity” is changing the face of marketing. One of the most significant example is the marketing campaign “Your Kenzo World”, for which Internauts could create GIFs from the perfume’s promotional video.

Another example with the upcoming movie Deadpool 2, we already knew movie trailers and then movie teasers but now, we have shorter: Movie GIFs. In the case of Deadpool 2, it is a three-seconds-long sequence from the first trailer which, transformed into a GIF, is becoming viral on Twitter.

However, Memes and GIFs are difficult instruments, there is fine line between a buzz and a flop. As it is more of a youngster thing, if marketers do not really know what they are talking about, such a post can be easily perceived as a “lame daddy joke”. It is also a matter of proper timing, what works today could be out-of-date tomorrow. And that is the flaw in the system, with GIFs and Memes, marketers will always follow the trend instead of creating it.

Gamification Is on The Rise: An Innovative Method for Boosting Customer Loyalty and Engagement https://goo.gl/uq429Y

As content marketing continues to be a key strategy in the digital era, marketers need to think of ways to keep the content engaging. That’s where gamification presents itself as a revolutionary tactic.

Wondering what gamification is??

Gamification is defined as “the application of typical elements of game playing (e.g., point scoring, competition with others, rules of play) to other areas of activity, typically as an online marketing technique to encourage engagement with a product or service.”

Why is it important??

  • First, it integrates fun and competition which makes your content more appealing to audience.
  • Second, gamification motivates players to do tasks that require effort or time which makes it the ultimate way to create engagement and build emotional connection with the consumer leading eventually to a longer relationship.
  • Third, gamification is estimated to rise up to 11.1 billion by 2020.
  • Fourth, according to the latest Nielsen report, 64% of the U.S. population (13+) are gamers and a typical millennial spends up to 96 minutes a day playing games on their phones.
  • Finally, gamification turns your customers into active “co-creators” by entertaining them while also encouraging their interaction and personal input.

Got the idea?? Now have a look at three of the best gamification examples!!

#1 Nike+ App:

 Nike took gamification and social media networking to a new level as it launched the Nike+ app that gives its users the opportunity to track their workouts, post their run statistics and challenge their friends and peers. A smart move was enabling the app users to post their runs on Facebook too; this increased awareness and demand for the Nike+ Fuelband.

#2 My Starbucks Rewards:

 As you may know, Starbucks value proposition is entirely built around creating exceptional brand experience for customers. Gamification is one of the tools used by the brand to amplify customers’ loyalty and engagement to enhance the Starbucks experience. My Starbucks Rewards loyalty program uses an application that enables players to collect stars (points) everytime they purchase a Starbucks product.

Curious to know the results of this gamification move?? In 2012, the users of My Starbucks Rewards totaled about 4.5 million. The cards alone accounted for $3 billion in sales per year.

#3 Coke Zero’s Drinkable Ad:

Coca-Cola is widely known to be one of the most creative and innovative companies when it comes to marketing campaigns.

To get more people to try out its Coke Zero, Coca Cola partnered with Shazam (app) to come up with a drinkable campaign. While watching the Ad, People can Shazam the spot which would then pour coke onto their phones and be redeemed later for a free Coke Zero at retail stores.

This gamification strategy resulted in 25% redemption rate.

 

Want to be noticed on Instagram ? Check out these 7 photo editing apps https://goo.gl/3zvpFx

The professionnal must-have : VSCO

Probably the most advanced app, a must-have for professional influencer. https://vsco.co

 

The most professional for beginners : Halide

Created by a former engineer of Twitter and a former designer of Apple, Halide can transform your smartphone into a genuine camera. This app makes it possible to adjust the settings of your smartphone as if it was a reflexe camera.

https://itunes.apple.com/fr/app/halide/id885697368?mt=8

 

The most delicious : Foodie

Want to share your delicious memories ? This smart app will be your new essential partner to improve your foodie reputation.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/foodie-camera-for-life/id1076859004?mt=8

 

The most esthetic : Litely

Getting bored of Instagram filters ? Try Litely : these filters have been created by the same photographer who designed most of the Insta filters. Old but gold (launched in 2014), one of the best apps with VSCO.

https://itunes.apple.com/fr/app/litely/id850707754?mt=8

The magic one : Touch Retouch

Photoshop in your pocket ? It is now possible with Touch Retouch. A trash can ruins your picture : you can simply erase it thanks to the multiple options of this magic app.

https://itunes.apple.com/fr/app/touchretouch/id373311252?mt=8

 

The most convenient : Snapseed

Designed by Google, this free app is a new essential to highlight, darken or change the saturation of your picture. Another good feature of this app : you can easily fix or erase some unwanted details , just by touching the screen with your finger.

 

The most self-centered : Microsoft Selfie

Thanks to its special filters, get rid of imperfections, and just look your best, even after the party of your life.

https://itunes.apple.com/fr/app/microsoft-selfie/id1064676206?mt=8

 

Want more ? Check out this Top 10 best photo editing apps for Iphone https://iphonephotographyschool.com/best-photo-editing-apps/

This is how brands generate a buzz !! https://goo.gl/rPAxGj

Here are 10 examples of the best social media marketing campaigns. They all made a huge buzz and attracted many followers and buyers! Learn from them to level up your own social media marketing campaign

  1. Burger King – Big come back

After 15 years of absence in France, Burger King made a very noteworthy comeback. They made a Facebook post with a comment saying they would open a restaurant in the city of the last person who comments on the post.

24 hours later, the post was commented more than 1300 times and 65 000 persons throughout the world saw it.

Of course, the last comment could never exist. Today, people are still commenting on the post. Burger King has now a bigger fan base, a better idea about where to open a restaurant, and the whole world knows they are coming back in France, without spending any more money than the Community Manager’s salary.

Like Burger King, use your social media channels to spread the news, but also ask for advice while making the buzz!

2. Cas Smirnoff – Tell me what you have in your fridge…

Smirnoff started a very efficient campaign on Instagram: take a photo of your fridge and post it on their Instagram account. Then, a bartender will use what you have in your fridge to make an incredible cocktail. That way, they increased a lot their fan base and their sales.

3. Le Louvre – Culture and YouTube

Le Louvre in Paris decided to improve their YouTube channel by inviting three YouTube influencers to the museum. They all made one video for the Louvre YouTube channel and one other for their own channel.

The objective was to show the museum under a new modern light. This initiative was a success, the videos were watched more than 1.3 billion times and more than 80 newspapers talked about it.

4. KFC recipes – Twitter followers

KFC’s marketing team started to follow just 11 persons on Twitter: the five original Spice Girls, and six dudes named Herb. This was linked to KFC’s secret recipe composed of five spices and six herbs.

A month later, one person noticed it and commented on it. This was the start of tens of thousands of other tweets, retweets, and comments on KFC’s news feed.

As Freddie Powell, creative director at Wieden+Kennedy, said: “Frankly, we weren’t sure if anybody was going to find it. Sometimes you just have to put stuff out into the universe and cross your fingers that the internet will work its magic.”

Subtle is a risk, but it can have a great payoff if it’s clever enough.

 

5. Dom from Domino’s – Chatbots are Coming

Domino’s Pizza used chatbots to enable clients to order a pizza via Facebook Messenger. The chatbot is even funny and makes jokes which created quite a buzz on social media.

 

6. Intermarché  – “L’amour, l’amour”

Intermarché, a brand of French supermarkets broke the rules of the usual ads of supermarkets by making a 3-minute short movie about friendship, love, and health. The story is about a young client who falls in love with a cashier.

We understand at the end that the purpose is an advertisement. Although the video appeared one time on television, it got more than 8.5 million views on Facebook, 2 million on Twitter, was 36,000 times shared and got 63,000 reactions.

7. WWF – #EndangeredEmoji

Seventeen of the animals included in the emoji index were identified as representative of endangered species. WWF used this insight to launch a campaign to raise donations for species protection. For each retweet of an animal emoji shared by the @WWF Twitter account, users were encouraged to donate 10 cents.

The launch tweet was retweeted more than 36,000 times with 38,000 responses. The campaign hashtag generated 1 million tweets and WWF gained more than 200,000 new followers and received 59,000 dollars of donations in the first two months of the campaign alone.

8. WesJet – “Real-Time Giving”

Before a flight, WestJet, a Canadian airline company asked their passengers what would they like for Christmas. After the landing, these passengers were surprised to see their desired gifts appear on the treadmill. Of course, everything was filmed and viewers could see children receiving toys and amazed grown-ups getting televisions or camera.

On YouTube, the ad got 200,000 likes and more than 20,000 comments for 40 million views. After this campaign, WestJet sales increased by 86% compared with the previous year…

Sometimes it pays to go really big.

9. Spotify –  Play This At My Funerals

In 2016, Spotify collected its users’ data to create a funny marketing campaign. The idea was to highlight the strange titles some users gave to their playlist. In a video, some artists got involved and were asked to react to the fact that their songs were on a “Play This At My Funerals” playlist. This original campaign generated a positive worldwide buzz as every user could identify themselves with it.

10. Burger King 2 – From one account to another

Another very simple post, but very efficient. They let people know about their different social media accounts and about their new “Xtra Long Chili Cheese”. If you want to see a whole picture of their very long new burger, you would have to follow the steps:

  • They started with a Facebook post: if you want to discover their new burger, you have to click on a link which redirects them to the Twitter account.
  • On the Twitter account, you find a new post with an image of the burger but the burger is not whole: you have to click on a link to see the whole burger.
  • Then, the link leads you to their Instagram account,
  • it goes on to their Vine account,
  • then on Youtube.
  • You end up the little game on Facebook, with a post announcing that the new burger is available in the restaurants, and you can see the end of the photo of the burger.

 

 

9 Things All Online Community Managers Have Experienced https://goo.gl/E7WQnP

  1. When you thought you had a dream internship and then you boss says “By the way, we have a Facebook page…”

2. When someone send a message to your page and you don’t want to lose the “very responsive to messages” badge

3. Meanwhile on Twitter

4. When no one, not even your colleagues, liked your post

5. When your boss wonder why you struggle every week to find new post ideas about cement mixers

6. Meanwhile on Instagram

7. When you invite your friends to like your page but it doesn’t work that well

8. When you download Facebook analytics and try to understand them

9. Meanwhile on Linkedin

10 Best social media campaigns

  1. Burger King – Big come back 

After 15 years of absence in France, Burger King made a very noteworthy comeback. They made a Facebook post with a comment saying they would open a restaurant in the city of the last person who comments on the post. 24 hours later, the post was commented more than 1300 times and 65 000 persons throughout the word saw it. Of course, the last comment could never exist. Today, people are still commenting on the post. Burger King has now a bigger fan base, a better idea about where to open a restaurant, and the whole world knows they are coming back in France, without spending any more money than the Community Manager’s salary.

2) Burger King 2 – From one account to another

 Once again a very simple post, but very efficient to let people know about their different social media accounts and about their new “Xtra Long Chili Cheese”. They started by a Facebook post: if you want to discover their new burger, you have to click on a link which redirect them to the Twitter account. On the Twitter account you find a new post with an image of the burger but the burger is not whole: you have to click on a link to see the whole burger. Then, the link leads you to their Instagram account, it goes on to their Vine account, then on Youtube. You end up the little game on Facebook, with a post announcing that the new burger is available in the restaurants, and you can see the end of photo of the burger.

3) Cas Smirnoff – Tell me what you have in your fridge…

 Smirnoff started a very efficient campaign on Instagram: take a photo of your fridge and post it on their Instagram account. Then, a bartender will use what you have in your fridge to make an incredible cocktail. That way, they increased their fan base by 676% on social media, and their sales increased by 20%.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YP9kHtqWT4

4) Le Louvre invite three youtubeurs

Le Louvre in Paris decided to improve their Youtube channel by inviting three youtubers to the museum. They all made one video for the Louvre Youtube channel and one other for their own channel. The objective was to show the museum under a new modern light. This initiative was a success, the videos were watched more than 1.3 billion times and more than 80 papers talked about it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfd4EXEBsho

5) KFC recipes – Twitter followers

KFC’s marketing team started to follow just 11 persons on Twitter: the five original Spice Girls, and six dudes named Herb. This was linked to KFC’s secret recipe composed by five spices and six herbs. A month later, one person noticed it and commented on it. This was the start of tens of thousands of other tweets, retweets and comments on KFC’s news feed. As Freddie Powell, creative director at Wieden+Kennedy, said: “Frankly, we weren’t sure if anybody was going to find it. Sometimes you just have to put stuff out into the universe and cross your fingers that the internet will work its magic.”

6) Dom from Domino’s – The Chatbots are Coming

Domino’s pizza used the chatbots to enable clients to order a pizza via Facebook Messenger. The chatbot is even funny and makes jokes which created quite a buzz on social media.

7) “L’amour, l’amour” – Intermarché

Intermarché, a brand of French supermarkets broke the rules of the usual ads of supermarkets by making a 3-minute short-movie about friendship, love and health. The story is about a young client who falls in love with a cashier. We understand at the end that it is a publicity. The video appeared one time on television and then got more than 8.5 million views on Facebook, 2 million on Twitter, was 36,000 times shared and 63,000 reactions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBUV8O4Jl7w

8) WWF #EndangeredEmoji

Seventeen of the animals included in the emoji index were identified as representative of endangered species. WWF used this insight to launch a campaign to raise donations for species protection. For each retweet of an animal emoji shared by the @WWF Twitter account, users were encouraged to donate 10 cents. The launch tweet was retweeted more than 36,000 times with 38,000 responses. The campaign hashtag generated 1 million tweets and WWF. WWF gained more than 200,000 new followers and received 59,000 donations in the first two months of the campaign alone.

9) « Real-Time Giving » de WestJet

Before a flight, WesJet, an airline company asked their passengers what would they like for Christmas. After the landing, these passengers were surprised to see their desired gifts appeared on the treadmill. Of course, everything was filmed and viewers could see children receiving toys and amazed grown-ups getting televisions or camera. On Youtube, the ad got 200 000 likes and more than 20 000 comments for 40 million views. After this campaign, WesJet sales increased by 86% compared with the previous year.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIEIvi2MuEk

10) Play This At My Funerals – Spotify

In 2016, Spotify collected its users’ data to create a funny marketing campaign. The idea was to highlight the strange titles some users gave to their playlist. In a video, some artists played the game and were asked to react about the fact that their song were on a “Play This At My Funerals” playlist. This original campaign generated a positive and worldwide buzz as every user could identify himself with it.

Psychological levers for a social media marketing approach

The recognition of Internet and social media as communication tools led to consider new marketing approaches. Far from being based on superficial principles, these 2.0 marketing strategies depend on real psychological levers. Consequently, analyse these levers would surely help brands in targeting audience and their needs.
Why do people express themselves on social media ? What are they looking for through these media ?
What are the reasons they need to exchange ?

Here are some psychological levers a relevant social-media strategy should take into account :

I) Humans are social animals

Humans are a part of society, they are social animals. Consequently, they need to communicate, to exchange on a daily basis. According to Nestor Fernandez Sanchez, psychologist and author, : « Social media break time and space barriers to establish and maintain interpersonal relationships thanks to the exchange of ideas. ». And these connections embody so many opportunities for brands to exchange with potential customers.

II) Seeking fame and need for recognition

Social media offer a new space and new opportunities for people who seek fame. For some of them, being famous on social media naturally means they are also famous in real life. Unfortunately, it can lead to Herostratus syndrome (a 4th-century BC Greek arsonist, who sought notoriety by destroying the Temple of Artemis. His name has become a metonym for someone who commits a criminal act in order to become famous.), one of unintended negative effects of social media. Not everyone wants to be famous, but all of us are looking for signs of recognition by our peers.
Actually, any human needs them, as a cornerstone of self-esteem. And these phenomena are deeply linked to the sense of belonging. According to psychologist Monica Quintana, our mindset is partly connected to the need, as human being, to belong to a community, something bigger than yourself.
« We need to be recognized by others in order to have a good self-esteem.».   We try to belong to a group, a community, either explicit or implicit. Getting involved in a community by sharing information, comments, and above all obtaining a reaction from your peers provide a social recognition.
We also like to exchange to show our individual perception to others. Carl Rogers make a critical analysis, saying that our personality is composed of the « True self » and the « Ideal self». Indeed, we increase the chances that get us closer to our ideal self. Here are some practical examples : publicly
support a politician to express your belonging to his movement, follow an artist to show your musical taste or share a funny video to expose your sense of humour.

III) Reciprocity

When setting up a social-media marketing strategy, brands have to keep in mind that they are constantly watched by users and potential customers. In order to generate an effective mutual relationship, the brand has to make the first move and offer a useful, qualitative content. The aim is to
create and maintain relationship with the customer, thanks to recipes, tutorials, or storytelling for instance. According to a New-York Times survey, 94% of users attach great importance to the usefulness of information they share. Consequently, it is the brand’s job to be particularly careful to the content they produce.

IV) Social proof

The social proof phenomenon influences the consumer behavior. Concretely, it is about how many times the brand is named (thanks to comments, reviews, advocating articles …). In marketing terms,
we talk about organically generated stimuli of the brand the consumer faces through his journey on social media. How to maintain the positive impact of these stimuli ? Answer cleverly to both positive and negative comments, thank your follower and engage the community even more.

V) Scarcity

A scarcity strategy can be truly efficient, as it is based on FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out), common feeling among regular users of social media. In fact, by offering an exclusive content or time-limited offers, the brand take advantage of a potential emotional distress a consumer can feel if he misses
information, opportunities or gifts. For instance, giveaway contest.

VI) Turn to consumer advantage

Finally, a very down-to-earth yet persistent lever is that most of users actions on social media are motivated by the fact that they can concretely take advantage of their engagement toward a brand (gifts, discount codes, etc). A survey shows that 67% of respondent users have ever liked a brand page in order to receive special offers.
To sum up, a social- media marketing strategy rests upon fundamentally human psychological levers and also psychological behaviors intensified by the context of social-media. As a result, it becomes essential for a brand to :
– Understand the psychology of its audience
– Understand deep explicit and implicit motivations of its audience. Why is the user present on this platform? As a brand, how can I fit in exchanges ? What is the specific web navigation path on this specific platform ?
How ? Thanks to analysis, scientific search, brand engagement. It may read tedious, but very helpful to identify an relevant customer persona, customer path to purchase through web navigating
behavior.